iinta Art Show

August 8th – iinta Art Show & Playing for Change Opening Ceremony

Come experience the iinta-resting lifestyle, art and style of iinta Magazine live and in person on August 8th at the Science North Cavern.

Join us for our gala Art Show presented by iinta. The gala will feature art by Indigenous artists, such as Michael Cywink, and vendors in the art and beauty genres. Many of our celebrity guests will also be in attendance for the opportunity to meet and greet their fans and The Human League Association supporters.

There will live entertainment such as DJ Groovy Betty, dancers and more! Follow iinta on Instagram and Facebook to keep up with the latest news on all Playing for Change events. Visit playingforchange.ca to buy tickets.

Playing for Change

August  8-10th

A 3-day event series featuring Art, Sport and Music!

Presented by iinta.ca and SocialRise Inc.

Sudbury, ON

iinta Art Show & Playing for Change Opening Ceremony

August 8th

Come experience the iinta-resting lifestyle, art and style of iinta Magazine live and in person on August 8th at the Science North Cavern.

Join us for our gala Art Show presented by iinta. The gala will feature art by Indigenous artists, such as Michael Cywink, and vendors in the art and beauty genres. Many of our celebrity guests will also be in attendance for the opportunity to meet and greet their fans and The Human League Association supporters.

There will live entertainment such as DJ Groovy Betty, dancers and more!

NHL Legends Golf Tournament

August 9th

We’ll be out on the golf course at Timberwolf Golf Club all afternoon with NHL Legends to raise funds in support of The Human League Association and Sudbury Manitoulin Children’s Foundation! After the event, there will be a gala dinner catered by Timberland, with an awards ceremony, featuring a silent auction with over 100 exclusive items and live entertainment.

NHL Players: 

  • Gilles Gilbert – Boston Bruins
  • Dennis Maruk – Washington Capitals
  • Andrew Desjardins – Chicago Blackhawks
  • Walt McKechnie -Detroit Red Wings
  • Mike Palmateer – Toronto Maple Leafs

Register your team of 4 for just $1000* or play individually for $250*

Tickets include access to gala dinner catered by Timberwolf, a silent auction with over 100 exclusive items, and live entertainment.

Gala tickets are also available separately. This includes a dinner, silent auction with over 100 exclusive items, and live entertainment. Tickets for the gala will be sold for $125* per person or $750* per table (seats 6).  

(*plus HST)

Register here: playingforchange.ca

Or email events@socialriseinc.com

SNAP! Playing for Change Concert

August 10th

Join us for an evening under the stars featuring international headliner SNAP! and many talented local acts! There will be vendors ready to share their delicious foods, artist merchandise, games and more! The concert begins at 6:00 p.m. and will run well into the night. 

Featuring: 

  • SNAP!
  • Mickey O’Brien
  • Jor’del Downz
  • Pop Machine
  • Bassline Jack

Tickets start at just $39 BUY TICKETS HERE!

Follow iinta on Instagram and Facebook to keep up with the latest news on all Playing for Change events. Visit playingforchange.ca to buy tickets.

NHL Legends Golf Tournament

August 9th – NHL Legends Golf Tournament

We’ll be out on the golf course at Timberwolf Golf Club all afternoon with NHL Legends to raise funds in support of The Human League Association and Sudbury Manitoulin Children’s Foundation! After the event, there will be a gala dinner catered by Timberwolf, with an awards ceremony, featuring a silent auction with over 100 exclusive items and live entertainment.

To register, please visit Playingforchange.ca

Or email events@socialriseinc.com

Presented by iinta.ca and SocialRise Inc.

Sudbury, ON

 

A Human Approach

By Kelly Louiseize

The Human League Association (THLA) is expanding its reach beyond children’s breakfast projects and extra-curricular activity assistance to include Greater Sudbury’s vulnerable.

Although the Breakfast Club of Canada has since opted into schools with equally healthy meals, THLA members say there are still students new to our city or who live alone below the poverty line.

By removing social and economic barriers faced in lower-income families, members can provide a healthy, safe environment for children, youth and young parents to grow a happier, healthier, more productive life.

Lorrie Leger, special education teacher with Life Skills at Sudbury Secondary School organizes the breakfast and snack program along with the gardening project and the Value Vault initiative. The latter is an in-house donation of clothes, hygiene products and food accessed by an estimated 30 to 40 students ranging from Grade 9 to Grade 12. Five other schools in the city have the same initiative. THLA will assist them through funding events along with the P.L.A.Y program now operating under the Sudbury Manitoulin Children’s Foundation.

The Value Vault began 12 years ago as a little room downstairs in the school and has since moved to Sudbury Secondary’s second floor. Every school day the room is left open for 30 minutes during lunchtime and after school. Students living on their own or from low socio-economic background can walk in and choose what they need. Foods like peanut butter, chili, beans are provided from the Sudbury Food Bank and The Human League Association.

“We do our best to remove the stigma and create a welcoming environment,” Leger says. “We are here to help. I think we have had great success in that. This is a no shame environment.”

Although they are not accepting donations at his time due to the pandemic, Leger witnesses the daily growing need of this program particularly because of their inner-city location.

“It is nice to know we have another helping hand with The Human League. Nutrition is everything.”

According to The Breakfast Club of Canada an estimated 2 million children go to school on an empty stomach. The reasons vary from long bus rides, rushed mornings, lack of healthy food choices to not having available foods.

Since COVID-19 measures came into play, much of THLA fundraising and volunteer activity has dropped off, but organizers are looking to drum up a new head of steam to embark on initiatives aimed at caring for the community’s vulnerable.

THLA founder and President Rodney Larocque and a board of eight are looking to assist street people with pop up clothing and essential toiletries. By broadening the constitution of THLA, it can help beyond the scope of children.

“Our primary role is fundraising,” Larocque says.

“The main thing is that we are making a difference where it’s needed.”

The president, who was once given the Trillium Award for the breakfast initiative which helped feed up to 1,600 children a day, says this new alliance creates a synergy within the community.  The Human League Association has raised more than $5 million through the years as a not-for-profit (BN #893072785RR0001). It currently has an intern to help organize projects.

“Anyone associated with The Human League Association must have a police check.”

This year marks its 25th anniversary. It has always been made up of members who work well behind the scenes for the good of the community. If this is something that appeals to you, please email membership. (info@humanleaguesudbury.com)

By Kelly Louiseize

From the foundation who ensures a place for children at camp comes a new campaign that aims to include every child in sports.

The Sudbury Manitoulin Children’s Foundation (SMCF) graciously welcomes the Positive Leisure Activities for Youth (P.L.A.Y) campaign, a former initiative introduced by The Human League Association that ensures financial assistance to children wishing to become involved in sports. Applicants can submit for up to $250 three times during the year and that funding will be directly paid for sports equipment.

“It is just to get children active and all the soft skills they are learning that they don’t even know (about),” says Anne Salter-Dorland, executive director of SMCF.

The program will assist low-income families with children up to the age of 18 purchase items for donated spots in sports. It is uncertain how many children will access P.L.A.Y this year which is one of the reasons there are three allotments. Funds are replenished with grants, fundraisers and social events.

“Kids go to school and listen to all the other kids talk about how much fun they had at soccer practice and some children can’t do that. It’s not fair. We should all have the right to play. This P.L.A.Y program is the only way some kids could participate in extracurricular activities, that they can form those adult forming memories of positive role models.”

The foundation’s area covers 50,000 square kilometers ranging from Manitoulin Island out to Massey, Greater Sudbury as far East as Sturgeon Falls and up to Chapleau, Ontario. It started in 1974 as a mom-and-pop initiative that evolved into a charitable organization in 1976. SMCF owned group homes that the Sudbury Manitoulin Children’s Aid rented for a nominal fee. In 1982, the society no longer required these homes and so the foundation sold them and used the proceeds plus donations to launch the Send-A-Kid-To-Camp program. This program covers the full complement of camp life experience from fees to transportation assistance to purchasing necessities like sleeping bags if children are in need. The idea is to help disadvantaged children experience childhood to the best of their abilities, which is still their mission today.

At its launch in 1984, Send-A-Kid-To-Camp program ushered in 270 children ages five to 14-years old to camps around Ontario. That number peaked to 722 in 2001 and settled to around 600-650 each summer since.

“Even last year with COVID-19 and everything we had to fight against, we still sent 300 kids to camp. This year we already have 300 kids placed and there are fewer camps this year than last year.”

Cost per child was $550, but that has risen to $750 due to increased staff because of the pandemic.

Salter-Dorland has witnessed three generations of families go through the program. Young mothers who have raised children that have become young mothers are dropping their child off for a week at camp. One lady who had gone to camp every year as a child remembers that her mother worked three jobs to keep a roof over our head while she babysat. She said she still remembers the songs, still keeps in touch with friends she met. She became a social worker.

In the first few years of Salter-Dorland’s career, she recalls picking up quiet children in her station wagon on route to camp, but on the way home “they were yelling, screaming and handing out addresses. They looked like they rolled in mud but they were so happy.”

An estimated 20,000 children have been helped by Send-A-Kid-to-Camp with each being referred by approximately 50 organizations, some of which are Ontario Works, Ontario Disability, Children’s Mental Health, Sudbury Housing, Child and Family Centres and Atikameksheng Anishnawbek. Coming from a region that houses 200,000 plus people with 50,000 being children, those numbers are significant.

“The common thread is that kids are in need. They wouldn’t be able to go if they didn’t have help.”

This leads to the third initiative run by SMCF, the Bursary Program. It provides financial assistance to current and former wards of the crown toward a post-secondary education. SMCF dispersed $150,000 to an estimated 100 applicants most of whom have experienced a long line of generational dependency and abuse.

“The key, it seems, is that they are coming from a lack of education. We are hoping to break that cycle.”

Applications are for ages 18-years old and up with the only criteria being “they have to be foster children either past or present.”

Bursaries range from $1,500 to $5,000 per applicant.

Should this organization that has seen almost 50 years in operation cease to exist, there would be hundreds of children each year prevented from experiencing childhood as it should be.

“That would be a crying shame.”

An estimated 50 volunteers work diligently behind the scenes fundraising at bingos, social events, driving children back and forth to camp, helping children fill out forms. Some even go to the child’s  home to ensure they have camp necessities and add what is needed.

Eight members comprise the board along with two hired hands: Anne Salter-Dorland, and a recent full time Program Director Sarah Russell. What the board likes to do is ensure one project is secure before welcoming another.

“We are always looking for new board members. Everyone around the table is in it for the kids,” she says. “There are no hidden agendas or self-glorification.”

Working for a non-for-profit foundation was a natural fit for Salter-Dorland. She saw her parents volunteer in schools and hospitals stepping in for those who couldn’t help themselves. The intent was to work for a couple of years then make her way back to southern Ontario. Thirty-one years later she is just as passionate about her career and looks forward to launching their new program.

Annually, the Human League Association hosts the Soap Box Derby Father’s Day weekend in the Southridge Mall parking lot. Participants race in soap box cars built themselves, or those donated to the Association over the years, hoping to win prizes for different categories. This is a great opportunity for some family fun for all ages.

The 2019 Soap Box Derby will take place on June 15th, 2019. Please contact us for your registration package to join us for this great event.

On January 25th we hosted our first Euchre Tournament. Now starting monthly you can join us in the progressive style tournaments with other Euchre players from around Sudbury. Keep an eye out for information regarding dates and times for the tournaments, and should you have any questions feel free to contact us at info@humanleaguesudbury.com. The next tournament will be on Friday, February 22nd.

The Curling Bonspiel was a huge success, bringing in funds for the organization’s major programs, and introducing many new people to curling. Hosted at Curl Sudbury, teams of four participated in a tournament until late in the night, enjoying musical performances as well.

Aviva, St. Louis Bar & Grill and Travelers were our major sponsors and supporters that allowed for this event to happen.


The Human League Association aims to remove social and economic barriers faced by families here in Sudbury. We reach out to the most vulnerable members of our society and guide them towards happier, healthier and more productive lives.

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